Category: sartorially

Vivienne Westwood on Vivienne Westwood

Vestoj

The Self on Display

The narrative of Westwood’s autobiography is built on her parallel engagement in fashion and activism, a dynamic she has maintained since her punk years. She and her one-time partner, Malcolm McLaren have been credited with having made fashion explicitly political through the creation of the punk uniform.

The Propaganda of Pantone

via Loki Design

Colour & Subcultural Sublimation

In the case of colour, Pantone Inc. holds incredible influence with their increasingly marketed and mediatised Colour of the Year campaigns. Purportedly determined through a prescient reading of the cultural zeitgeist (by a select cabal of colour specialists), it is important to understand that the company, and the industry it serves, have their own specific interests and agendas that drive these selections. Pantone’s choice of “Rose Quartz” and “Serenity” as the 2016 Colour of the Year is the most insidious move by this colour-industrial-complex since “Blue Iris” in 2008. As with “Blue Iris”, Pantone has once again mined the subcultural landscape and used their monopoly within the creative industries to propagate their colour properties to the world.

Chiara Vigo: The last woman who makes sea silk

Max Paradiso for the BBC from Sardinia

watching a craft disappear

Some believe it was the cloth God told Moses to lay on the first altar. It was the finest fabric known to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, and one of its remarkable properties is the way it shines when exposed to the sun, once it has been treated with lemon juice and spices.

The First Black Trans Model Had Her Face on a Box of Clairol

New York Magazine

…in 1975.

We’re living in a time when trans models like Lea T and Andreja Pejic have been the faces of Redken and Make Up For Ever, and Caitlyn Jenner has been celebrated on the cover of Vanity Fair. This kind of cultural acceptance makes it easy to lose sight of how dangerous it was 40 years ago — and still can be today — for women like Norman to just walk down a street. Fear of harassment from both police and civilians was constant. To live one’s life openly as a transgender woman, let alone one as a black trans woman, simply wasn’t done. The only option, really, was to “pass” in straight society.

Laura Balke, via Instagram

The apotheosis of the deliberately boring normcore turtleneck was found on Steve Jobs, who arrived at his stark trademark look after striking up a friendship with the designer Issey Miyake, who gave him 100 or so of them. Troy Patterson for the New York Times

Can the Turtleneck Ever Be Cool Again?

I can only imagine that Issey Miyake might bristle endlessly unto his death with this association that will never be forgotten, of a rich man so completely and utterly lacking in personal style that he demand one of the finest craftsmen in clothing make for him a shapeless fisherman’s sweater, bearing no resemblance to the craft for which he was hired. Read the entire piece at the New York Times.

Ishiuchi Miyako, at The Guardian, from a collection at The Getty in Los Angeles

Milan Zrnic, via Instagram

Princess Cheeto, via Instagram

Brian Kenny, via Instagram

original content © 2018 patric king.